Tag Archive | SFU

C4H Blog Announcement!

Hello dear readers!

This blog was originally created for a graduate course in Advocacy and Communication for Health taught by Dr. Kitty Corbett in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University.

As of 5pm today, all the grades have been submitted and a collective sigh of relief has gone up from those of us finishing the term. Many are graduating, others are spending the next few months working on practicums, and a few are taking courses during the summer term. As a class, we contributed 108 blog posts from Jan. 17th to April 23rd 2013.

And it turns out – we’re pretty popular!

In just a few months, we’ve had almost 4000 views from 64 different countries around the world!

Screen Shot 2013-04-28 at 2.43.27 PM

Together we have built up a useful resource that many have taken the time to send their thanks for – here are just a few of the reader comments that have been left on our blog:

I love your website! Thank you so much for sharing and imparting.” -Anonymous From India

Thanks for posting this! – Philadelphia Theatre for the Oppressed

Great article. Never consider marketing ethics being played out in religious groups! Thanks for posting the bullet points for ethical behaviour, very useful!” – MorallyMarketing.com

I wholeheartedly believe that when you are creating any type of health communication materials, it is absolutely critical to have members of the priority community participate on the development team because they do, in fact, have a rich lived experience that simply cannot be overlooked or minimalized. Thanks for sharing!” – Ohio Government member

I’d like to thank all of my colleagues for their amazing contributions and insights. This blog is an excellent example of the great synergy that comes from collective work in our Master of Public Health program at Simon Fraser University.

Since this is such a great resource, and it seems to be helping people around the world who are interested in public health, I volunteered to continue contributing to and moderating the blog, and a few of my fellow graduate students have also chosen to come forward as continuing authors. We look forward to continuing to build on these ideas and share them with you!

If you have a specific interest that you would like us to write about, or if there is a resource you would like us to review, please leave a comment below or if you prefer, send me an email: stopps@sfu.ca

Sarah Topps 2013 [Communication4Health moderator]

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A note to my colleagues: please send me an email by May 31st if you are interested in continuing to contribute (as little as twice every 6 months) and I will make up an author profile for you on the about page. After May 31st, I will be changing the status of anyone who has not emailed me so that they cannot modify the blog entries.

22 Rules of Storytelling by Pixar

Yup… you read that right – even Pixar uses formulas for success!

As health promoters, so much of what we do involves storytelling. We can learn from places such as Pixar, because let’s face it… their stories are sticky. Almost anyone raised in North America can tell you who this guy is:

buzz_lightyear_in_toy_story_3-1280x960

This list was originally tweeted by Emma Coats, a former story artist at Pixar who is now out in the world doing her own thing. I stumbled across this while reading Chris Blattman’s blog: ChrisBlattman.com – he is an associate professor at Columbia University in the field of political science and international development. He updates his blog frequently and his posts vary enough that there is usually something for everyone, whether they are a policy geek or not. For now, back to Pixar’s rules of storytelling. I’ve listed my four favourites below. (Why four? Why twenty-two? Why not?)

#4, Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.

#9. When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.

#15. If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.

#19. Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.

You can find the rest of the list over at aerogrammestudio.com

– Sarah Topps

How to Add Some Pizzazz to Your Blog Posts

This blog post will show you how to use some of WordPress.com’s built-in features to make your blog post really POP!

Bold and Italic work the same way as in Microsoft Word – simply click the or I buttons (or use ctrl+b/ctrl+i)

> Adding colour is also the same as in Word, simply highlight the text, and choose your colour from the drop-down menu
(Just be careful which colours you use – some are very hard to read, such as yellow, white, or neon green!

text colour button

> To add a hyperlink, you simply select the text that you wish to link, and select the link buttonthe-link-button

> To add images or other file types from your computer, click the “Add Media” button at the top left corner, above B and I

media-button

(Allowed file types: jpg, jpeg, png, gif, pdf, doc, ppt, odt, pptx, docx, pps, ppsx, xls, xlsx. Max size: 1 GB )

> You can also add a YouTube video or other HTML embedded features by clicking “Embed” underneath any YouTube video and copy+pasting the provided link directly into your blog post like so:

embedding youtube image

The video will then appear in your post looking like this:

> Add a category (How-To…) and tags (health, communication, blog, Youtube, SFU) on the lower right hand side of the page

> Finally remember to always sign your blog posts (Take credit where credit is due!)

– Sarah Topps 2013

How to Start Blogging in 6 Easy Steps

1. Visit WordPress.com and click “Get Started” to sign up

2. Enter your email, a username and password, and then choose a name for your blog

Or, if you prefer to post to an existing blog, click “sign up for just a username” to the right of the blog name box

3. Check your email and confirm your registration

4. Sign in to WordPress.com > go to MyBlogs > click “Create New Blog

(Bonus step: Anytime after this point, you can go back to MyBlogs and click “Change appearance” to choose a theme!)

5. Under MyBlogs, you should now see your new blog – click “1 Post” and then near the top of the page “Add New Post

6. You should now see a box where you can add text, pictures and videos. When you are finished editing, click Publish!

For some good tips on How to Write a Good Blog Post – check out this post by the British Council.
To see what good blog posts look like and maybe find some inspiration, check out Time Magazine’s Top 25 Blogs of 2012!
If you’re having trouble with any of the steps above, or if you want to learn more about WordPress.com, check their support page.
Have fun playing around with the various buttons and settings. Welcome to the world of blogging!

– Sarah Topps 2013