Tag Archive | low literacy

Presenting Health Data to Low Literacy Populations

Ever wondered how to effectively present your health materials to low literacy populations? Check out the following presentation for some useful tips and tools:

Health Data for Low Health Literacy

The purpose of this document is to get you to understand why health communication is important within the context of low health literacy. It addresses some key strategies that you can use to effectively communication health information to these kinds of populations. At the end of the presentation is a list of some valuable resources that you can further consult when preparing to present your materials.

Here are some additional helpful links on the topic:

http://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/developmaterials/PlainLanguage.html

http://phil.cdc.gov/phil/home.asp (a cool CDC public health image database!)

http://www.howto.gov/training/classes/plain-language-to-communicate-health-information

On a somewhat related note, here’s an interesting approach to providing a health message that is culturally appropriate:

– Misha B.

Simply Put – A CDC guide for creating easy to understand materials

I was perusing the CDC website today and stumbled across this really helpful resource: Simply Put – A guide for creating easy to understand materials

Since low health literacy and numeracy is such a big issue, both in Canada and in other parts of the world, I think it’s really important to think about some of the issues that this guide brings up when putting together resources. Some of the key topics included:

1. Make Your Message Clear 
2. Text Appearance Matters 
3. Visuals Help Tell Your Story >> including a link to the CDC public health image database

Image

4. Layout and Design
5. Consider Culture
6. Translations Take Your Message Further 
7. Testing for Readability >> including formulas for calculating the readability of a document!

Also, at the back of the manual there is a Checklist for Easy-to-Understand Print Materials and lists of other resources to expand your knowledge even further.

– Sarah Topps 2013